The Late Night Write

MoonQuote All you night writers, raise your hands. I know you're out there, chugging coffee past midnight or working on your second glass of wine. I see you mothers and fathers, hours after you've tucked your children into bed, trying to finish "just one more chapter" before they wake again. I see you young men and women, staying home on a Friday night while your friends go out, tending to the friends in your book instead. I see you because I'm awake at that ungodly hour too.

You're not alone. Writing and nighttime go together like breathing and coffee (because as long as I'm breathing, I've got to have coffee, am I right?). Sometimes we even try to go to bed at a decent hour like normal people, just to sit up in bed hours later with a perfect line in our head, or a picture so beautiful we've got to write it down. I don't know about y'all, but I get some of my best material when I'm falling asleep. When my body and mind relax and the constraints on my thinking start to float away, that's when the good stuff comes. So what do you do when that happens? Fall asleep and try to remember it all the next morning? Of course not! You get up in the middle of the night and write. And  more often than not, that writing turns out to be some pretty good stuff.

I will say to Saul Bellow that I don't deal in absolutes-- everythings and nevers don't sit well with me. It's entirely possible that you might write when you're not quite alert enough to write, then wake up the next morning, look at your work in progress and say, "What is this gobbeldy-gook and how did it end up in my novel?" Let's face it: we can't be perfect all the time. However, I can see his point: If something is important enough for you to drag yourself out of a half-dream state and away from your warm, cozy bed, it's usually going to be pretty good. Even if it's not flawlessly executed, the "meat" of it typically stays. So keep sleepwalking to your computers, notebooks, and typewriters, my friends. That late night write is something to strive for.

... But that's only been my experience. What about you? Do you find your dream-writings add to your works, or do they usually end up in the trash bin? Am I the only one who has the best ideas at night? Can't be! Can it?

Today's Prompt: Your significant other, of whom your friends, family, and coworkers do not approve, has asked you to run away with him/her. You plan to meet at your "special place" at midnight, but when you set off to meet him/her, you run into a series of obstacles: three not so pleasant, and one very pleasant. What are they and how do you/your significant other react?

Happy Writing!